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{{Annual Business Network and Board of Trustees Symposium}}
{{2012 Annual Business Network and Board of Trustees Symposium}}
 
'''Held At [http://www.laposadadesantafe.com/ La Posada de Santa Fe], 330 E. Palace Ave., Santa Fe, NM'''
 
'''November 1-3, 2012'''
 
'''Organized by:'''
Doug Erwin, Chair of Faculty and Professor, SFI; Chris Wood, Vice President of Administration and Director of the Business Network, SFI
 
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== '''"Resilience"''' ==
 
 
A resilient system is one that is able to maintain function in the face of disturbance. Confronted with disturbance, a system can either increase its hardness in an attempt to decrease the impact of the disturbance or increase its resilience and, within limits, minimize the impact and recover more quickly. Hardening a system tends to increase brittleness, and may actually contribute to large-scale failures. This understanding has influenced the design of bridges, airplane wings, and even paper clips. However, hardening also occurs in biological, financial and social systems. Our increasing understanding of the response of these systems to stress provides a framework to move beyond earlier qualitative studies of resilience. The November 2012 Business Network and Trustee Symposium will focus on the topic of resilience and its role in ecosystems, financial markets, social systems, and other networks.

Latest revision as of 21:38, 28 August 2012

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Held At La Posada de Santa Fe, 330 E. Palace Ave., Santa Fe, NM

November 1-3, 2012

Organized by: Doug Erwin, Chair of Faculty and Professor, SFI; Chris Wood, Vice President of Administration and Director of the Business Network, SFI


"Resilience"

A resilient system is one that is able to maintain function in the face of disturbance. Confronted with disturbance, a system can either increase its hardness in an attempt to decrease the impact of the disturbance or increase its resilience and, within limits, minimize the impact and recover more quickly. Hardening a system tends to increase brittleness, and may actually contribute to large-scale failures. This understanding has influenced the design of bridges, airplane wings, and even paper clips. However, hardening also occurs in biological, financial and social systems. Our increasing understanding of the response of these systems to stress provides a framework to move beyond earlier qualitative studies of resilience. The November 2012 Business Network and Trustee Symposium will focus on the topic of resilience and its role in ecosystems, financial markets, social systems, and other networks.